Technology Demonstrations

April 3 - 6, 2017
San Jose, CA
DoubleTree San Jose

Demonstrations

Quantifying PTP Performance in an Impaired Network

Presented by Albedo

This presentation will demonstrate the effects of different network impairments on the performance of 1588v2 in terms of time error and other metrics. An assortment of impairments such as asymmetry, packet delay variation, packet loss and network loading will be emulated with a combination of a synchronization test set and WAN emulator. The impairments will be applied to the output of a PTP grandmaster and measured with a synchronization test set to highlight PTP performance limitations in the presence of various impairments through such measurements as MTIE, TDEV and TE.

Demonstration of the Impact of SyncE Phase Transients on the Transfer of Time by PTP

Presented by Calnex

The transfer of PTP can be supported by transferring frequency through the Physical Layer using Synchronous Ethernet, (SyncE). Using these two mechanisms in tandem offers the potential for improved performance. However, it also introduces the potential for interactions between the layers that need to be managed and controlled. When switching occurs of the physical layer path, short phase transients occur on the downstream SyncE signal. The magnitude and speed of change are defined by the ITU-T in G.8262. If this SyncE signal is input to a PTP Boundary Clock downstream that utilises SyncE frequency steering of the PTP clock, such transients have the possibility of producing phase changes in the PTP output of the T-BC. It is important the designer of the T-BC considers this and designs his device to manage such transients. This technical demo will discuss the mechanisms for interactions between the physical layer and the PTP time transfer, and will demonstrate the reaction in the PTP phase to a Physical Layer phase transient.

GPS Jamming Detection

Presented by Chronos

Chronos will demonstrate its GPS Jamming Detection Technology. This will include a camera linked to the detection system allowing a photo to be taken of a vehicle which is carrying a jammer and this image to be sent by email to a mobile. The demonstration will include the use of model race track , vehicles carrying a Jammer Detector Tester and associated camera and mobile data technology.

1.5usec Hold Over Timing Accuracy which is Involved in FURUNO Advanced OCXO Built-in Type GNSS Component

Presented by Furuno Electric

GNSS DO (GNSS Disciplined Oscillators) composed by GNSS receiver and OCXO or Rb oscillator can provide high accurate timing and frequency to users and is used by broadcasting equipment and mobile base station etc. However, the robustness has room to be improved against a positioning interruption or an influence of multipath, jamming etc and FURUNO has been improving it as GNSS receiver vender. For example:

  • The technology to use multi GNSS constellation efficiently.
  • The technology to decrease an influence of multipath or jamming.
  • The technology to keep high accurate timing even in case GNSS is not available to use --- Hold Over. Especially, 1.5usec Hold Over timing accuracy is attracting notice.

MEINBERG NetSync - PTPv2 Monitoring Sync and Performance of Telecom Network MEINBERG NetSync - PTPv2 Monitoring Sync and Performance of Telecom Network

Presented by Meinberg

The MEINBERG NetSync Monitor logs and reports the synchronization status and performance of remote PTPv2 monitored slave nodes and Boundary Clocks on the Telecom network. The NetSync monitoring technology can store, send and display the current and past synchronization status of PTPv2 devices in the network exchanging the standard IEEE 1588 message types - Delay Request, Delay Response, Sync and Follow-up and an additional TLV for the PTP status information of the monitored devices.

In the WSTS demonstration the MEINBERG LANTIME M4000 IMS will act as primary reference time clock (PRTC) serving PTPv2 Telecom profiles to the network. The M4000 will fulfill the role of NetSync Monitoring System (MS) at the core as well. The design of MEINBERG NetSync allows for multiple MS nodes in a network, not necessarily the PRTC. The monitored slave nodes at the edge of the telecom network will consist of a MEINBERG LANTIME M1000 IMS and a MEINBERG SyncBoxN2X.

Key points of the demonstration include the graphical demonstration of each PTP slave sync performance over time and a short explanation of the key data points gathered by the Monitoring System.

MEINBERG's next generation high precision & high performance HPS-100 IEEE1588 time stamping module will be showcased demonstrating the sheer power of supporting thousands of PTP slaves as well as the ability to monitor network PTP slaves and Boundary Clocks on the Telecom network.

The MEINBERG NetSync Monitor logs and reports the synchronization status and performance of remote PTPv2 monitored slave nodes and Boundary Clocks on the Telecom network. The NetSync monitoring technology can store, send and display the current and past synchronization status of PTPv2 devices in the network exchanging the standard IEEE 1588 message types - Delay Request, Delay Response, Sync and Follow-up and an additional TLV for the PTP status information of the monitored devices.

In the WSTS demonstration the MEINBERG LANTIME M4000 IMS will act as primary reference time clock (PRTC) serving PTPv2 Telecom profiles to the network. The M4000 will fulfill the role of NetSync Monitoring System (MS) at the core as well. The design of MEINBERG NetSync allows for multiple MS nodes in a network, not necessarily the PRTC. The monitored slave nodes at the edge of the telecom network will consist of a MEINBERG LANTIME M1000 IMS and a MEINBERG SyncBoxN2X.

Key points of the demonstration include the graphical demonstration of each PTP slave sync performance over time and a short explanation of the key data points gathered by the Monitoring System.

MEINBERG's next generation high precision & high performance HPS-100 IEEE1588 time stamping module will be showcased demonstrating the sheer power of supporting thousands of PTP slaves as well as the ability to monitor network PTP slaves and Boundary Clocks on the Telecom network.

Timestamping at Nanosecond Resolution with MetaWatch

Presented by Metamako

Metamako demonstrates Network Packet Broker functionality by replicating, aggregating and time stamping network data to nanosecond level resolution with its MetaWatch data capture product. With live network traffic, the demo will show integrated tapping functionality, nanosecond resolution timestamping and aggregated deep-buffered capture.

PTP Time and Phase Transfer with Asymmetry Compensation

Presented by Microsemi

Microsemi will demonstrate Time and Phase Transfer using the ITU-T G.8275.2 Precision Time Protocol telecom profile for time/phase synchronization with partial timing support from the network. Focus of the demonstration will be to share real world results, and innovative asymmetry compensation capabilities to assure accurate and protected time transfer in real world network conditions.

The Master Could be Quartz OCXO

Presented by Morion

Most telecom applications require precise time and frequency and synchronization to operate properly in order to get excellent performance and quality of service for the subscribers. In most applications GPS is a primary source and key component of synchronization in telecom but is very sensitive to jamming and interference because the signal levels are so low. Holdover is the time period required to keep the network sync-stabilized when the source of sync is disrupted or temporarily unavailable. Holdover is achieved by equipping base stations with oscillators that can temporarily hold over signals.

This demonstration will introduce new generation of precise OCXO oscillators which outperform Rubidium Oscillators in many aspects such as temperature stability, phase noise, short term stability, power consumption, size, reliability, weight, operating temperature, lead time, inventory cost and replacement cost. MV 360 OCXO has extremely low temperature sensitivity of 1E-11 at any 200C windows (approximately 10 times better than temperature stability of the best rubidium clocks) which is ideal for holdover applications at a fraction cost of Rubidium clocks.

NextNav's MBS Timing Solution in GPS Challenged Environments

Presented by NextNav

In this demonstration, we'll be showcasing NextNav's MBS based timing solution that can receive signals from MBS beacons around the SF bay area and provide a very stable 1PPS, 10MHz and UTC time reference deep indoors.

Clock systems are historically categorized into stratum levels of accuracy according to GR-1244 standards. This classification scheme has worked well for systems where frequency synchronization and holdover are critical. However, this scheme no longer provides sufficient and relevant performance metrics for designers of phase and time synchronization applications such as cloud RAN and mobile backhaul that rely on IEEE 1588 and other packet based synchronization protocols. This presentation proposes a new classification scheme that defines clock performance in terms of time and phase synchronization and holdover capabilities under real life operating profiles. Major contributing factors such as ?F/?T, critical to a given time and phase synchronization capability, are also discussed. The overall objective of this proposal is to make the clock classification more meaningful by enabling engineers to efficiently specify the most optimal clock performance without having to use stratum level as a proxy to time and phase holdover performance..

Phase Delivery and Assurance at the Access Networks

Presented by Oscilloquartz

Oscilloquartz will demonstrate phase & frequency delivery and assurance using our board portfolio:

  • Enabling a network to accurately deliver frequency and phase using Miniature Sync plug GM/BC/Slave and Probe enabler
  • Small/Medium/Large scale PTP grand masters and APTS (Using OSA 54xx family)

Testing Dynamic Performance of High-Precision TCXOs under Changing Environmental Conditions

Presented by SiTime

The proliferation of synchronization in advanced 4G/5G systems imposes more stringent requirements on the timing reference. However, at the same time with greater network densification, telecom and networking equipment is increasingly deployed in uncontrolled and harsh environments that can negatively affect timing accuracy and impact system performance. The timing reference must deliver dynamic performance – the capability to meet key specifications such as frequency stability, jitter and phase noise in real-world environmental conditions such as extreme and rapid temperature changes, high airflow and vibration. This demonstration will show how to test oscillators under various fluctuating conditions. We will illustrate the dynamic performance of two best-in-class TCXOs (one MEMS-base and the other quartz-based) by simultaneously exposing both devices to high airflow, rapid temperature change, VDD fluctuations, mechanical vibration and shock (tap test), and show how to observe and quantify the impact on performance including Allan deviation and frequency stability.

Precise Indoor Timing Synchronization with STL

Presented by Spectracom

STL is a new, globally available satellite signal available today providing:

  • Time Sync
    • Augment GNSS with an independent stronger signal
    • Anti-spoof with subscriber authentication of encrypted signal
  • Deep Indoor Penetration
    • No outdoor installation or cabling required
    • 1000x stronger than GPS
  • Trusted Location
    • Security based on geo-location

    Test Methodology for Resilience of GNSS Timing Receivers to Vulnerabilities

    Presented by Spirent

    Many industries rely on GNSS for reliable and accurate timing. Demonstration will show the effectiveness of a GNSS simulator:

    • To calibrate timing error of clocks to nanoseconds (such as PRTC/GM)
    • With test scenarios for common and major GNSS events
    • Providing performance tests for GNSS impairments

    GNSS and Atomic Clock Applications and Expectations for Field Testing

    Presented by VeEX

    This demo focuses on small built-in GNSS receivers and atomic clocks currently used for field testing and their different characteristics, functions and applications. Including, free-run characteristics, GNSS survey, disciplining, transport time, holdover expectations, battery autonomy, as well as their challenges and limitations. VeEX will show the process of getting the precision oscillator disciplined to GNSS/UTC timing (normally done outside), put the instrument into sleep mode, carrying the timing in holdover (e.g. to allow transportation and pass security check points) and still be able to be used indoors to measure wander and verify time error.

    Acquiring, maintaining and carrying UTC-aligned 1PPS timing into indoor locations, without GNSS coverage, for testing purposes has always been a challenge. From a controlled lab point of view, this may look trivial, but from real-life field operations perspective there are many challenges to overcome in order to assure accurate results. Practical field solutions have to deal with lack of on-site clock references, power consumption, battery autonomy, temperature variation, Time Error (TE) drift, among other factors.

    From Frequency delivery point of view, this may not look that difficult: Calibrate the built-in precision oscillator and rely on its frequency retrace (repeatability) characteristics. Transporting Phase or Timing, on the other hand, may not be that simple.

    Four years of field testing and research allowed VeEX to be the first in defining a practical timing/phase reference delivery solution for field test and measurement, based on miniature atomic oscillators.

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