ATIS Telecom Glossary
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bandwidth (of an optical fiber)
The lowest modulation frequency at which the RMS peak-to-valley amplitude (optical power) difference of an intensity-modulated monochromatic signal decreases, at the output of the fiber, to a specified fraction (usually one-half) of the RMS peak-to-valley amplitude (optical power) difference of a nearly-zero (arbitrarily low) modulation frequency, both modulation frequencies having the same RMS peak-to-valley amplitude (optical power) difference at the fiber input. Note 1: In multimode fibers, multimode distortion is usually the most significant parameter limiting fiber bandwidth, although material dispersion may also play a significant role, especially in the first (850-nm) window. Note 2: In multimode fibers, the bandwidth•distance product (loosely, "fiber bandwidth") is customarily specified by vendors for the bandwidth as limited by multimode distortion only. The spectral width of the optical source is assumed to be extremely narrow. In practice, the effective fiber bandwidth will also be limited by dispersion, especially in the first (850-nm) window, where material dispersion is relatively high, because optical sources have a finite spectral width. Laser diodes typically have a spectral width of several nanometers, FWHM. LEDs typically have a spectral width of 35 to 100 nm, FWHM. Note 3: The effective risetime of multimode fibers may be estimated fairly accurately as the square root of the sum of the squares of the material-dispersion-limited risetime and the multimode-distortion-limited risetime. Note 4: In single-mode fibers, the most important parameters affecting fiber bandwidth are material dispersion and waveguide dispersion. Practical fibers are designed so that material dispersion and waveguide dispersion cancel one another at the wavelength of interest. Note 5: Regarding effective fiber bandwidth as it affects overall system performance, it should be recognized that optical detectors such as PIN diodes are square-law devices. Their photocurrent is proportional to the optical power of the detected signal. Because electrical power is a function of the square of the current, when the optical power decreases by one-half (a 3-dB decrease), the electrical power decreases by three-fourths (a 6-dB decrease). 2. Loosely, synonym bandwidth•distance product.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 
These definitions were prepared by ATIS Committee PRQC
 
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